Charity

Knit with me on The Longest Day!

Please join me on The Longest Day (Sunday, June 20) as I knit to raise awareness (and hopefully a whole lot of funds) for the Alzheimer’s Association. Each year the Alzheimer’s Association challenges individuals to help fight the disease by raising funds and awareness for care, support, and research on the day with the most light.

For my part, I’ll knit from sunrise (somewhere around 5:00 am) to sunset (somewhere around 9:00 pm) Mountain Standard Time on a pair of socks I designed specifically for this event.

The cable-and-eyelet pattern in my Fading Memories Socks represents the twists and turns in the memories of those afflicted with Alzheimer’s, in a gradient colorway inspired by The Longest Day logo.
For every Fading Memories Socks pattern sold, I will donate $5 to Alzheimer’s research.

The yarn I used is Fading Shadows gradient kit of 5 mini skeins specially dyed by Greenwood Fiberworks. The yarn is 75% superwash merino and 25% nylon; there are 92 yards (20 grams) of each color for a total of 552 yards (120 grams). The gradient kits are available through Longmont Yarn Shoppe of Longmont, Colorado.

For every gradient pack of Fading Shadows sold, Longmont Yarn Shoppe will donate $10 to Alzheimer’s.

On Sunday, June 20 (the longest day of 2021), I’ll knit another version of Fading Memories Socks and post my progress in hourly (or somewhat hourly) Instagram posts.

Because it’s better to knit together, some of my favorite yarn shops have joined in the fun. In addition to donating a percentage of their sales to Alzheimer’s, they will host free Zoom knit-a-longs (I’ll be there), complete with prizes and special offers. Contact the shops directly to register. Those who join all four knit-a-longs will have a chance for special awards.

Four Purls of Winter Haven, Florida: 10:00 to 11:00 am Eastern Time (9:00 to 10:00 am Central Time, 8:00 to 9:00 am Mountain Time; 7:00 to 8:00 am Pacific Time)

River City Yarns of Edmonton, Alberta: 12:00 to 1:00 pm Mountain Time (2:00 to 3:00 pm Eastern time, 1:00 to 2:00 pm Central Time, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm Pacific Time)

Bazaar Girls Yarn Shop of Port Townsend, Washington: 1:00 to 2:00 pm Pacific Time (4:00 to 5:00 pm Eastern Time, 3:00 to 4:00 pm Central Time, 2:00 to 3:00 pm Mountain Time)

Longmont Yarn Shoppe of Longmont, Colorado: 4:00 to 5:00 pm Mountain Time (6:00 to 7:00 pm Eastern Time, 5:00 to 6:00 pm Central Time, 3:00 to 4:00 pm Pacific Time)

Follow me on Instagram at annbuddknits. Better yet, join me in the knit-a-longs and support a great cause!
Either way, please visit my  fundraiser page and make a donation.

Thank you.

 

Fading Memories Socks

These gradient socks were designed for the 2021 Longest Day event sponsored by Alzheimer’s Associations (alz.org)–an annual fundraiser that takes place on the summer solstice. This event is important to me as my mother, as well as several friends have been afflicted with the disease.

For every pattern sold, $5 will be donated to Alzheimer’s research.

The yarn used here is a special gradient set based on the colors in The Longest Day logo and represents the fading memories of those suffering Alzheimer’s. The stitch pattern is a combination of alternating closely spaced cables and a “wandering” eyelet pattern that represents the mental confusion of fading memories. On the knitter’s part, the pattern requires a bit of concentration that keeps the mind alert.

Worked from the top down, these socks begin with the Twisted German (also called Old Norwegian) cast-on and end with the Kitchener stitch. A flap-and-gusset heel provides a comfortable fit, especially for feet with high insteps. To create a slight flare that accommodates the calf muscle, one size larger needles are used for the cast-on and upper leg.

The stitch pattern is presented in both written and charted format.

A KAL in Support of Alzheimer’s Research

As more of my friends and family become victim to Alzheimer’s disease, I find myself more passionate about the fight against it. That’s why I’ve registered to take part on The Longest Day this summer to raise awareness (and hopefully a whole lot of funds) for the Alzheimer’s Association.

The Longest Day is the day with the most light (the summer solstice), which will be June 20 this year. It’s also the day that the Alzheimer’s Association calls on everyone to fight Alzheimer’s disease by raising funds and awareness for care, support, and research. For my part, I’ll knit from sunrise (somewhere around 5:00 am) to sunset (somewhere around 9:00 pm) Mountain Standard Time.

 

I’ve designed a special project for this event. The Fading Memories crescent shawl (available on Ravelry) represents the increasing holes in the memories of those afflicted with Alzheimer’s, in a colorway inspired by The Longest Day logo.

For every Fading Memories pattern sold, I will donate $5 to Alzheimer’s research.

 

 

 

The yarn I used is The Mystery of The White Plum gradient kit of 6 mini skeins specially dyed by indie dyer Schmutzerella Yarns. The yarn is 75% superwash merino and 25% nylon; there are 92 yards (20 grams) of each color for a total of 552 yards (120 grams). The Fading Memories shawl uses nearly all of the 552 yards in the gradient pack.

For every gradient pack sold (click here to order), Schmutzerella Yarns will donate $5 to Alzheimer’s.

 

I’m delighted to announce that other indie dyers and yarn shops have join in the fight by producing other yarns that work equally well for the Fading Memories shawl pattern.

Sun Valley Fibers has created a merino/cashmere/nylon gradient set of six 100-yard skeins (600 yards total) called The Longest Day.

Kits will initially be available at The Longmont Yarn Shoppe, in Longmont, Colorado, and later at www.SunValleyFibers.com.

For every gradient pack of The Longest Day sold, $10 will be donated to Alzheimer’s.

 

 

Emma’s Yarn, based at Four Purls Yarn Shop in Winter Haven, Florida, has dyed a special Hella Hank (80% superwash merino, 20% nylon; 600 yards). The color, called Bright Spot, is a reminder to look for the positive in any unfortunate situation.

For every skein of Bright Spot sold, $5 will be donated to Alzheimer’s.

 

 

The Bazaar Girls Yarn Shop and Fibre Emporium in Port Townsend, Washington, is offering three yarn choices.
They will donate 10% of proceeds of each skein of the following yarns sold to Alzheimer’s if you mention the Fading Memories shawl.

Elemental Affects Civility (70% US merino, 30% mulberry silk; about 600 yards) in the special Fading Memories colorway.

Available at The Bazaar Girls Yarn Emporium in Port Townsend, Washington.

 

Colinton Lace Blends (80% unbrushed mohair, 20% silk; 250 yards) in the Slate Variegated colorway.

You will need two to three skeins for the Fading Memories shawl shown above.

Colinton Lace Blends are only available at The Bazaar Girls Yarn Emporium in Port Townsend, Washington.

 

 

Jorstad Creek has a three-skein set (600 yards total) of Ursa Minor fingering weight (75% superwash merino, 15% nylon, 10% silver stellina): 1 skein each of Silver, Lavendar, and Sapphire. The kit colorway is called Stardust Memories.

Available at The Bazaar Girls Yarn Emporium in Port Townsend, Washington.

 

On June 20 (the longest day of this year), I’ll knit another version of my Fading Memories shawl and track my hourly progress through Instagram posts. Follow me at annbuddknits. Better yet, join me in the knit-a-long and support these yarn shops and indie dyers while donating to a great cause!

Either way, please visit my fundraising page and make a donation. You don’t have to wait until June to give — funds are welcome right now.

Thank you.

Looking Forward to the Longest Day

As more of my friends and family become victim to Alzheimer’s disease, I find myself more passionate about the fight against it. That’s why I’ve registered to take part on The Longest Day this June 20th to raise awareness (and hopefully a whole lot of funds) for the Alzheimer’s Association.

The Longest Day is the day with the most light — the summer solstice. And it’s the day the Alzheimer’s Association calls on everyone to fight Alzheimer’s disease by raising funds and awareness for care, support, and research. For my part I’ll knit from sunrise (somewhere around 6:00am) to sunset (somewhere around 9:00pm). I’ll track my progress in hourly Instagram (annbuddknits) posts.

By supporting me as I knit on The Longest Day, we can stand up to the darkness of Alzheimer’s.

Can I count on you to help by making a donation?

Please visit my fundraising page and give today. Thank you!

Sincerely,
Ann

An Inspiring Book

I’ve been in a bit of a nesting/cleaning mode the past few weeks.

So far, I’ve gone through 80% of the closets, drawers, and cabinets in my house (excluding my yarn stash) and have donated boxes and bags of excess clothing and household items to charity. Honestly, I believe the gust of wind you might have felt was my house exhaling a huge sigh of relief.

I bragged to my knitting group about my progress and one knitter nodded her head and said, “Oh, yes. Swedish death cleaning.” I had never heard of such of thing (my roots are Norwegian, not Swedish) and thought she was kidding.

She has since loaned me a fascinating book written in 2018 by a woman “somewhere between eighty and one hundred years old” who has death cleaned for so many others that she’s “dammed if someone else [will have] to death clean after [her].” Having cleaned out my parents’ house, I completely agree with her. With the exception of my precious yarn stash, which my family knows to distribute among my knitting friends, I don’t want my husband, kids, or siblings to have to deal with what they will see only as clutter.

Perhaps I’m procrastinating on “more important” work that has to be done at my desk, but I now feel the need to revisit all those closets, drawers, and cabinets for a second sweep!

 

It’s Good to Give

It’s that giving time of year again and once again I encourage you to make a purchase through Heifer International (self proclaimed “the most important gift catalog in the world”) to provide a living income to a family or community in need. Heifer invests in farmers and business owners around the world, spreading secure sources of income that translate into nutritious food, shelter, clean water, education, health care, and a safe and and secure environment–things that so many of us enjoy daily.

From $10 to $100,000, the catalog offers an assortment of livestock, agriculture, and education options to fit every budget. I’m in the habit of purchasing a $20 flock of chicks or geese for each of my siblings.

And, as I have done every November for years, I’ve purchased a Knitters’ Basket in an attempt to spread the joy that knitting has brought me.

With just a click of the mouse, I’ve sent one llama, one alpaca, one sheep, and one Angora rabbit (along with instructions on how to properly care for the animals) to a family or community looking for ways to become self sufficient. The coats of these animals provide fiber that can be made into warm clothing and a source of income from the sale of clothing and blankets. Everyone is a winner!

Please include Heifer in your holiday gift-giving, too!

Season of Giving

If you’re reading this message, chances are good that you’ve got shelter, electricity, and ample food. In this season of giving, I encourage you to do something for those less fortunate. From food banks to shelters to medical supplies and research to micro-loans, there are a lot of important ways to help.

My personal favorite organizations are (in no particular order) Heifer International (working with communities to end world hunger and poverty and care for the earth), Doctors Without Borders (an independent global movement providing medical aid where it’s needed most),  Alzheimer’s Research (the leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimers care, research, and support), and Kiva (providing loans to celebrate and support people looking to create a better future for themselves, their families, and their communities).

Imagine if we all gave just $10!