Thigh-High Stripes–First Sock Completed

I’ve made a lot of progress on my version of Deborah Newton’s Thigh-High Stripes. This is because I chose to shorten the leg considerably and because color stripes always encourage me to keep knitting to see how a new color looks next to the others. Before I could stop myself to take a photo, I finished the entire sock!
It hasn’t been blocked yet so it’s a little wrinkly here, but I’m thoroughly satisfied.

Here are the changes that I made to the original instructions:

  • I used two sizes smaller needles to give me a gauge of 10 sts/in instead of the 9 sts/in called for in the pattern. This is because I like my socks to be really, really dense.
  • I CO 84 sts (this had to be a multiple of 6 sts to fit the colorwork patterns) for the top of the leg and I maintained this stitch count for the entire length of the leg. I also worked the entire leg on the same size needles, which isn’t different from the original patt but is different from my typical method of working the upper leg on a size larger needles.
  • I used rust for most of the ribbing, heel, and toe (there wasn’t enough brown left) and I switched out other colors to my fancy, while working Charts C, D, B, and E with rust instead of brown for the pattern.
  • I worked about 1 3/4″ of ribbing, then worked the leg until the piece measured 6 1/2″ from the CO edge. In retrospect, I wish I had worked 7″ for the leg.
  • Right before beginning the heel flap, I put a holder through the leading legs of 6 sts in the row below the sts on the needle to prevent the sts from stretching as I worked the heel flap and, therefore, prevent a hole from forming at the top of the gusset (see my blog post for Wednesday, Sept 14).
  • I worked the heel flap on 42 sts for 42 rows, ended the heel turn with 24 sts, and picked up 21 sts for each gusset–there were 108 sts at the beg of the gussets.
  • I decreased the gussets to 80 sts to make the foot a little tighter than the leg.
  • I decreased the toe every other round to 40 sts, then every rnd to 24 sts and finished with Kitchener stitch.
Because I love the colors and pattern in these socks, I’m not even daunted by the number of ends that have to be woven in. The sock is sure to look a whole lot better after I weave in the ends and give it a long soak in a warm bath.