Classes


Cast-OnsBind-Off

Cast-On and Bind-Off Techniques

Hours: 6 (can be split for cast-ons or bind-offs only for 3 hours each); There are a variety of ways to cast-on and bind-off stitches, each with its own advantages. In the morning half of this one-day workshop you’ll learn at least five different cast-ons and when to use them to provide strength, elasticity, invisibility, or decoration. In the afternoon, you’ll learn at least five different bind-offs and when to use them. You’ll learn each technique in a separate swatch that you’ll keep for reference. Cast-on methods will include long-tail, old Norwegian (aka, German twisted), tubular, provisional, Channel Island, and more as time permits. Bind-off methods will include suspended, I-cord, three-needle, sewn, decrease, invisible ribbed, and more as time permits.
Skills: Intermediate knitting skills; must be familiar with making yarnovers.
Materials: One partial ball of your choice of yarn (tightly twisted wool or wool blend recommended); knitting needles in a size appropriate for your yarn; one extra knitting needle for working the three-needle bind-off; tapestry
needle; crochet hook.
Homework: (required) Knit eight swatches in stockinette stitch: Cast on 12 stitches and work in stockinette stitch until piece measures about 1½”, ending with a wrong-side (purl) row. Cut yarn, leaving a 24” tail. Place stitches
on a holder. Knit 1 swatch in k1, p1 rib: Cast on 12 stitches and work in k1, p1 rib until piece measures about 1½”. Cut yarn, leaving a 36” tail. Place stitches on a holder.

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Conquer Kitchener Stitch

Conquering Many Forms of Kitchener Stitch

Hours: 3
Meet Kitchener stitch head on and overcome your fear, whether it’s used on stockinette stitch, reverse stockinette stitch, garter stitch, or ribbing. Through working samples and learning tips, you’ll laugh in the face of this too-often dreaded grafting stitch.
Skills: Intermediate knitting skills.
Materials: Yarn and needles (double-pointed needles are preferred) used for homework swatches; tapestry needle.
Homework: (required) With your choice of yarn (tightly twisted worsted-weight wool or wool blend is recommended) and knitting needles in a size appropriate for your yarn, knit nine swatches: two in stockinette stitch, two
in garter stitch (ending one with a right-side row and the other with a wrong-side row), three in k1, p1 ribbing (begin each row with k1); two in k2, p2 ribbing (begin each row with k2). Each swatch should contain 12 stitches and measure about 2” long.
Cut yarn, leaving a 24” tail for working the Kitchener stitch. Place swatches on holders.

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Read Your Knitting

Reading Your Knitting (and Charts)

Hours: 6
Most knitters run into problems when they aren’t able to “read their knitting”—that is, they can’t recognize where they are in a pattern by simply looking at the stitches on the needles or in the fabric below the needles. How do you tell where you are when you’ve put your knitting down in the middle of row? Can you tell how many rows you’ve knitted since the last increase, or decrease? How do you know what type of increase or decrease was worked? In this class, we’ll knit a swatch (or two) and examine how the basic stitches look in a piece of knitting and how those stitches are represented in charts.
Skills: Advanced-beginner knitting skills; must know how to cast on, bind off, knit, purl,increase, and decrease.
Materials: One partial ball of your choice of yarn (tightly twisted worsted-weight wool or wool blend recommended); knitting needles in a size appropriate for your yarn; cable needle (optional); crochet hook.

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Fixing Mistakes

Fixing Mistakes

Hours: 3
In this class, we’ll examine how the basic stitches look in a piece of knitting, and practice fixing common mistakes, including ripping out, picking up dropped stitches (even edge stitches!), reversing the direction of a cable turn, and correcting a snag that breaks the yarn.
Skills: Advanced-beginner knitting skills; must know how to cast on, bind off, knit, purl, and turn a cable.
Materials: One partial ball of your choice of yarn (tightly twisted worsted-weight wool or wool blend recommended); knitting needles in a size appropriate for your yarn; cable needle; crochet hook.
Homework: (required)
CO 18 sts.
Row 1 and 3: (RS) K4, p2, k6, p2, k4.
Rows 2 and 4: (WS) K6, p6, k6.
Row 5: (RS) K4, p2, slide 3 sts onto a cable needle and hold in front of work, k3, k3
from cable needle, p2, k4.
Rows 6 and 8: (WS) K6, p6, k6.
Rows 7 and 9: (RS) K4, p2, k6, p2, k4.
Row 10: (WS) K6, p6, k6.
Rep Rows 1–10 once more (20 rows total). Place sts on a holder.

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Decorative Cast-Ons
NEW: Decorative Cast-Ons

Hours: 3
Learn an assortment of decorative cast-on techniques that will add unexpected style to the edges of whatever you knit. Techniques will include Channel Island, I-Cord, Braid, Fringe, and others as time permits.
Skills: Advanced-beginner knitting skills.
Materials: Worsted-weight yarn in two colors (tightly twisted wool or wool blend recommended); U.S. size 8 (5 mm) knitting needles (double-pointed needles are preferred); tapestry needle.

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Matching CO and BO
NEW: Matching Cast-Ons and Bind-Offs

Hours: 3
Learn three to four interesting and elastic cast-ons and their matching bind-offs. Armed with these techniques, you can get the same look at the cuff and toe of socks knitted from the toe up or top down, the hem and neck edges of sweaters, and the two ends of scarves.
Skill: Advanced-beginner knitting skills; must be comfortable knitting in rounds with
double-pointed needles (or a suitable substitute).
Materials: Tightly twisted sport-, DK, or worsted-weight wool yarn (you’ll use just
part of a ball); a set of double-pointed needles in a size appropriate for your yarn (two circulars or the “magic loop” method can be substituted); tapestry needle.

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Flexible CO and BO
NEW: Flexible Cast-Ons and Bind-Offs

Hours: 3
Socks are most comfortable if the cuff edge is flexible enough to stretch over the heel and firm enough to hug the leg. Learn a variety of my favorite methods for starting and ending socks, whether they’re knitted from the toe up or the top down, including the Cable, Old Norwegian (also called German Twisted), and Tubular cast-ons, as well as Jeny’s Surprisingly Stretchy, Tubular, and Sewn bind-offs.
Skills: Advanced-beginner knitting skills; must be comfortable knitting in rounds with double-pointed needles (or a suitable substitute).
Materials: Tightly twisted sport-, DK, or worsted-weight wool yarn (you’ll use just
part of a ball); a set of double-pointed needles in a size appropriate for your yarn (two circulars or the “magic loop” method can be substituted); tapestry needle.

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Shadow Knitting
NEW: Shadow Knitting

Hours: 3
Variously called “Japanese fine knitting” and “optical knitting, “shadow knitting” is the term introduced by Vivian Høxbro to describe a technique in which purl ridges define a pattern on a two-color striped stockinette-stitch background. The right-side ridges cast a “shadow” pattern that comes and goes depending on the angle at which it is observed. When viewed straight on, the fabric resembles simple two-row stripes. When viewed at an angle, the garter ridges predominate and a different pattern is visible. Learn this ingenious technique by knitting a swatch with a heart motif.
Skills: Advanced-beginner knitting skills; must be familiar with reading charts.
Materals: Tightly twisted sport-, DK, or worsted-weight wool yarn in two
colors—one light and one dark (you’ll use just part of each ball); needles in a size appropriate for your yarn; stitch markers.

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Cup Cozy for Steeks class
NEW: Knitting Steeks and Inserting Zippers

HOURS: 6
Materials Fee: $1 for zipper
Learn how to add steeks so two- (or more) color patterns that are worked in rounds can be cut open—typically for a front opening, armholes, and neckline of a sweater. In this class, you’ll knit a coffee clutch with a two-color pattern and steek stitches, then cut the steek open and finish the cut edge with a colorful zipper.
Skills: Advanced-beginner knitting skills; must be comfortable working on double-pointed needles (or a suitable substitute).
Materials: Worsted-weight wool yarn in two colors (you’ll use just part of each ball); a set of U.S. sizes 7 and 8 (4.5 and 5 mm) double-pointed needles (two circulars or the “magic loop” method can be substituted); tapestry needle; sharp-point sewing needle and sewing thread to match one of the yarn colors.

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Intro to Sweater Design

Introduction to Sweater Design

Hours: 3
Knitwear designers use gauge and body measurements to create the perfect fit in a sweater, hat, or other knitted piece. Learn the magical formulas that will allow you design your own garments or adjust existing ones with ease! No more puzzling over how
to increase or decrease evenly in a single row or gradually over many rows—you’ll have the answers in moments. You’ll also learn tips and trick that simplify the knitting and finishing process.
Skills: Advanced-beginner knitting skills.
Materials: Pencil and paper for taking notes; calculator.

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Sweater Basics and Finishing

Sweaters from the Bottom Up—Basics and Finishing

Hours: 12
In this two-day workshop, we’ll follow the pullover instructions in The Knitter’s Handy Book of Sweater Patterns by Ann Budd. The sweater will be worked in four pieces—one back, one front, and two sleeves. To minimize the amount of knitting, all
students will work a miniature sweater (it may fit an infant) in worsted-weight wool yarn. To prepare for the class, students will knit the four pieces to the armholes and choose between drop-shoulder, modified drop-shoulder, and set-in sleeve shaping,
and between round and V-neck shaping. You’ll learn basic sweater design and construction principles for working in pieces from the bottom up, how to follow patterns in all The Knitter’s Handy Book series by Ann Budd, as well as tips and tricks along
the way.
Skills: Intermediate knitting skills.
Materials: The Knitter’s Handy Guide to Sweater Patterns (or make arrangements to share with a friend); The Knitter’s Companion or other technique reference book (optional but helpful); two skeins of worsted-weight
wool or wool-blend yarn (acrylic is not recommended as it will not block) such as Brown Sheep Lamb’s Pride Worsted or Cascade 220 (you may need only one skein but you want to be sure not to run out); size 7 or 8 straight needles plus a set of double-pointed
needles in the same size or one size smaller for neckband, if desired (two circulars or the “magic loop” method can be substituted); tape measure; calculator; tapestry needle; stitch holders; round stitch markers and removable stitch markers.
Homework: (required)
Back: With worsted-weight yarn and appropriate needles (your choice of size 7 or 8), cast on 42 stitches. Continuing to knit the first and last stitch of every row for selvedge stitches (these will facilitate seaming later), work the edging of
your choice (rib, garter st, seed st, etc.) for about 1”. Knitting the first and last stitch of every row, continue in stockinette stitch (knit right-side rows; purl wrong-side rows) until piece measures 5” from the cast-on edge, ending with a wrong-side
row. Place stitches on holder.
Front: Work same as back.
Sleeves (make 2): Cast on 20 stitches. Knitting the first and last stitch of every row (selvedge stitches), work the edging of your choice for about 1”. Choose between drop shoulder, modified drop shoulder, and set-in sleeve style. Continue as
described below for your choice.
For Drop Shoulder or Modified Drop Shoulder Styles:Continuing to knit the first and last stitch of every row, work in stockinette stitch and increase 1 stitch at each end of needle (inside selvedge stitches) every 2 rows 9 times, then every 4 rows
2 times—42 stitches. Work even until piece measures 5” from cast-on edge, ending with a wrong-side row.
For Set-in Sleeve Style: Continuing to knit the first and last stitch of every row, work in stockinette stitch and increase 1 st at each end of needle (inside selvedge stitches) every 4 rows 5 times—30 stitches.Work even until piece measures 4½”
from cast-on edge, ending with a wrong-side row.

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Top-Down Raglan and Circular Yoke

Sweaters from the Top Down—Raglan and Seamless Yoke Styles

Hours: 6
Because they can be tried on for fit along the way and because they require no seaming, many knitters prefer to knit sweaters from the top-down. Following the techniques outlined in The Knitter’s Handy Guide to Top-Down Sweaters, learn the basics
for knitting a sweater from the top down by knitting a miniature pullover (it may fit an infant) in worsted-weight yarn. In class you’ll choose between raglan and seamless yoke styles and between a crew and V-neck. You’ll learn basic sweater design and
construction principles for working from the top down, how to follow patterns in all The Knitter’s Handy Book series by Ann Budd, as well as tips and tricks along the way.
Skills: Advanced-beginner knitting skills and experience on double-pointed needles.
Materials: Two skeins of worsted-weight wool or wool-blend yarn, such as Cascade 220 or Brown Sheep Lamb’s Pride Worsted (you may only need one skein but you don’t want to run out); The Knitter’s Handy Guide to Top-Down Sweaters (or
make arrangements to share with a friend); size U.S. 7 or 8 needles in 24” circular and set of 4 or 5 double-pointed (two circulars or the “magic loop” method can be substituted); tape measure; tapestry needle; size F, G, or H (3.75 to 4.75 mm) crochet
hook; stitch holders; round stitch markers and removable stitch markers.

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Top-down set-in sleeve mini

Sweaters from the Top Down—Set-in Sleeve Style

6 hours
Because they can be tried on for fit along the way and because they require no seaming, many knitters prefer to knit sweaters from the top-down. Following the techniques outlined in The Knitter’s Handy Book of Top-Down Sweaters, learn the basics
for knitting a sweater from the top down by knitting a miniature crewneck pullover in worsted-weight yarn. You’ll learn basic sweater design and construction principles for working from the top down, how to use The Knitter’s Handy Book of Top-Down Sweaters,
as well as tips and tricks along the way. ADVANCED-BEGINNING KNITTING SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE ON DOUBLE-POINTED NEEDLES REQUIRED.
Materials: Two skeins of worsted-weight wool or wool blend yarn (acrylic is not recommended as it will not block), such as Cascade 220 or Brown Sheep Lamb’s Pride Worsted (you may only need one skein but you don’t want to
run out); The Knitter’s Handy Guide to Top-Down Sweaters (or make arrangements to share with a friend); size U.S. 7 or 8 needles in 24” circular and set of 4 or 5 double-pointed (two circulars or the “magic loop” method can be substituted); tape
measure; tapestry needle; stitch holders; round stitch markers and removable stitch markers.
Homework: Sweater Upper Back:
With worsted-weight yarn and your choice of U.S. size 7 or 8 needles, cast on 30 stitches, placing a removable marker (to help identify stitches to pick up later) each side of the center 14 stitches (8 stitches at each edge). Shape shoulders over the
next 7 rows as follows:
Row 1: (WS) K1, p28, k1.
Row 2: (RS) K25, wrap the next stitch (there will be 4 unworked stitches), then turn the work.
Row 3: P20, wrap the next stitch (there will be 4 unworked stitches), then turn the work.
Row 4: Working the wrap together with the wrapped stitch when you come to it, knit 2 stitches past the wrapped stitch, wrap the next stitch (there will be 1 unworked stitch), then turn the work.
Row 5: Working the wrap together with the wrapped stitch when you come to it, purl to 3 stitches past the wrapped stitch, wrap the next stitch (there will be 1 unworked stitch), then turn the work.
Row 6: Knit to end of row, working the wrap together with the wrapped stitch when you come to it.
Row 7: K1, purl to end of row, working the remaining wrap together with the wrapped stitch when you come to it. Continue even in stockinette stitch, knitting the first stitch of every row (these “selvedge” stitches will facilitate picking up stitches
for the sleeves), until a total of 20 rows have been worked (including cast-on row), counting from the center of the piece where the greatest number of rows have been worked and ending with a wrong-side row. Do not cut yarn. Leave stitches on the needle.

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socks at any guage

Socks at Any Gauge

Hours: 3
Want to make socks that fit perfectly, no matter what yarn or needles or stitch pattern you use? This workshop will teach you how to measure your foot, knit a swatch, and devise a standard top-down pattern for any size foot and any gauge of knitting.
Skills: Advanced-beginner knitting skills and experience knitting socks from the top down.
Materials: Tape measure; calculator; yarn of your choice and appropriate needles; ideas for stitch patterns; markers.

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Top-down sock. round heel, wedge toe

Top-Down Socks with Round Heel and Wedge Toe

Hours: 6
Following the techniques outlined in Getting Started Knitting Socks, learn the basic formula for knitting socks from cuff to toe using a flexible Norwegian cast-on, standard round heel with gussets, and finishing with the Kitchener stitch. You’ll
make a small sock to learn all the skills in one day, including how to add stitch patterns, and leave ready to knit socks in a variety of sizes and yarn weights. You’ll also learn how to follow any of the patterns in Getting Started Knitting Socks.
Skills: Advanced-beginner knitting skills; must be comfortable working on double-pointed needles.
Materials: Tightly twisted sport-, DK-, or worsted-weight wool yarn (you’ll use just part of a ball); a set of double-pointed needles in a size appropriate for your yarn (two circulars or the “magic loop” method can be substituted
if you’re comfortable making the conversion from instructions written for double-pointed needles); tapestry needle; Getting Started Knitting Socks (optional).

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Top-down sock. short-row heel and toe

Top-Down Socks with Short-Row Heel and Short-Row Toe

Hours: 6
Knit a sock from the top down while learning to shape both the heel and toe with short-rows, eliminating the need for picking up and decreasing gusset stitches for the heel and eliminating the dreaded Kitchener stitch for the toe. You’ll make a small
sock to learn all of the skills in one day and leave ready to knit socks in a variety of sizes and yarn weights.
Skills: Advanced-beginner knitting skills; must be comfortable working on double-pointed needles.
Materials: Tightly twisted sport-, DK-, or worsted-weight wool yarn (you’ll use just part of a ball); a set of double-pointed needles in a size appropriate for your yarn (two circulars or the “magic loop” method can be substituted
if you’re comfortable making the conversion from instructions written for double-pointed needles); tapestry needle; Summer 2007 issue of Interweave Knits (recommended).

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Toe-up sock. short-row heel, wedge toe

Toe-Up Socks with Wedge Toe and Short-Row Heel

Hours: 6
Most knitters learn to knit socks from the cuff down to the toe, but they can also be knitted in the opposite direction—from toe up to the cuff, eliminating the need to pick up stitches for the gusset or work the dreaded Kitchener stitch. Learn to knit
socks from the toe up using an Eastern cast-on, short-row heel, and flexible sewn bind-off. You will make a small sock to learn all of the skills in one day and leave ready to knit socks in a variety of sizes and yarn weights.
Skills: Intermediate knitting skills; must be comfortable working on double-pointed needles.
Materials: Tightly twisted sport-, DK-, or worsted-weight wool yarn (you’ll use just part of a ball); a set of double-pointed needles in a size appropriate for your yarn (two circulars or the “magic loop” method can be substituted
if you’re comfortable making the conversion from instructions written for double-pointed needles); tapestry needle; Summer 2007 issue of Interweave Knits (optional).

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Better Than Booties

Better-Than-Booties Baby Socks

Hours: 6
Tired of baby booties? Knit a pair of adorable baby socks instead! In this class, you’ll learn the decorative Channel Island cast-on, master short-row heels and toes, and learn a decorative zigzag bind-off. These small socks, modeled after the Better-Than-Booties
Socks in the Summer 2005 issue of Interweave Knits, are ideal for using up leftover sock yarn and delighting new mothers.
Skills: Intermediate knitting skills; must have experience working on double-pointed needles with fingering weight yarn.
Materials: Partial ball of machine washable fingering or sock weight yarn (a full ball will make three pairs); a set of size 1 to 3 (depending on how tightly you want to knit the sock); a set of 4 double-pointed needles (two
circulars or the “magic loop” method can be substituted if you’re comfortable making the conversion from instructions written for double-pointed needles); tape measure; removable stitch markers; tapestry needle.

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Mitten Basics

Mitten Basics

Hours: 6
Following the techniques outlined The Knitter’s Handy Book of Patterns, learn to knit a mitten using a flexible Norwegian cast-on, side-seam thumb gusset (so the mitten fits equally well on either hand), and spiral top. You’ll make a small mitten
to learn all the skills in one day and leave ready to knit mittens in a variety of sizes and yarn weights. You’ll also be prepared to follow any of the patterns in The Knitter’s Handy Book series by Ann Budd.
Skills: Advanced-beginner knitting skills; must be comfortable working on double-pointed needles.
Materials: Tightly twisted sport-, DK, or worsted-weight wool yarn (you’ll use just part of a ball); a set of double-pointed needles in a size appropriate for your yarn (two circulars or the “magic loop” method can be substituted
if you’re comfortable making the conversion from instructions written for double-pointed needles); tapestry needle; The Knitter’s Handy Book of Patterns (optional).

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