Just before the holidays I spoke with Andrea Doig of Fruity Knitting for her 22nd podcast. I’m delighted to be associated with this interesting and informative platform!

You can watch the podcast on YouTube or at the Fruity Knitting website (which also includes program notes). In this episode, you’ll also learn about waist shaping and meet Dayana of Dayana Knits, yarnbuster and tinkerer extraordinaire.

Check it out!

 

 

This Saturday (Feb 4), I’ll be teaching Top-Down Sweaters with Raglan Shaping at the Longmont Yarn Shoppe. The shop has declared 2017 the year of the sweater and is scheduling classes to encourage knitters to join in the fun. My full-day class is based on the patterns in The Knitter’s Handy Book of Top-Down Sweaters. We’ll follow modified instructions for raglan construction to knit a miniature sweater (it may fit an infant or teddy bear) and learn how to knit a raglan sweater (an example is pictured at the bottom of the book cover) from the top down and how to use The Knitter’s Handy Book of Top-Down Sweaters in general.

I’ll have a trunk show of sweaters on hand for inspiration and a collection of books to sign.

If you’re in the area, join the class or stop by and say “hi!”

 

I spent a good part of last week taping what will be my third (3rd!) class for Craftsy. This class is titled Knit Like A Master and includes as much information as I could cram into the two-hour format. For this class, I deciphered all the techniques that I feel are most important for any knitter to know.

As usual, I arrived the first day to find a star on the door of “my” studio.

I posted an Instagram expressing my delight and was pleasantly surprised that some of my followers thought it was a little lame. According to paolo_vino, “This image is not exactly expressing permanent ‘star status’ on the owner, is it? I mean: Who was chalked-in before … and Who gets chalked-in next. Come on Craftsy … You need to UP YOUR GAME!”

Well, I showed that comment (and others expressing the same thoughts) to my crew. The next day, my star was “upped”.

But that wasn’t good enough. One follower said, “Better … at least it’s not smudged!”

 

The third, and final, day I got some color! What a difference three days make! Get a load of the balls of yarn in the “d”s.

 

 

 

 

For three days I was treated by royalty (with the exception of the temporary star) and had a lot of fun, despite the many re-takes. (Sorry guys!)

Thanks to Danica (on the left) for giving my hair and face a go-over. Danica has been in charge of hair and makeup for all three of my Craftsy tapings. She’s cute as a button, thoroughly talented, and a whole lot of fun to boot. I wish I could have taken her home.

 

 

 

 

And thanks to my crew, from left to right: Rob (director of photography), me (the “talent”), Stephanie (producer), and Ivana (technical).

Due to an error on my part (I forgot to make clear the closing date for the original promotion),  I’m extending my offer three of my skirt patterns (Lacy Pleats, Putting On The Pleats, and Take Two Skirt) for a combined discount of $12 (that’s more than 30% off the price of purchasing them separately) until midnight February 2.

I’ve unofficially declared 2017 the year of handknitted skirts. It’s a little-known fact that skirts are much easier to knit than a sweater (one piece, very little shaping, no seams, fewer fit issues) and takes about the same amount of yarn as three pairs of socks.

Each skirt design features an elastic waistband, increases along four “darts” for a fitted silhouette from the waist to the high hip, then “pleats” separated by wedge-shaped “gores” to the hem. Because the skirts are knitted from the top down, it’s easy to adjust the length to your personal preference. For the best fit, choose a size that’s one to two inches smaller than your actual high-hip circumference.

Putting On The Pleats is my first skirt design in which stockinette-stitch pleats are separated by reverse stockinette stitch gores. It’s worked with sock (fingering weight) yarn at a gauge of 7.5 stitches/inch.

Sizes: 33 1/2 (35 1/2, 37 1/4, 39 1/4)” high-hip circumference (allow for 1″ to 2″ of negative ease).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As the name implies, Take-Two Skirt is my second skirt design in which I added a slip-stitch pattern in each of the pleats for a more elongated look. Like Putting On The Pleats, Take-Two is worked with sock (fingering weight) yarn at a gauge of 7.5 stitches/inch.

Sizes: 34 (36, 38, 40)” high-hip circumference (allow for 1″ to 2″ of negative ease).

 

 

 

 

 

Lacy Pleats features a simple lace design in each of the pleats, which are separated by reverse stockinette stitch gores.  This design is worked with Spirit Trails Fiberworks Brigantia at a gauge of 6 stitches/inch.

Sizes: 33 1/4 (36 3/4, 40, 43 1/4, 46 3/4)” high-hip circumference (allow for 1″ to 2″ of negative ease).

And for the adventurous knitter, I’m teaming up with Jeane DeCoster of Elemental Affects: A U.S. Yarn Company to teach a workshop on designing your own custom-fit skirt at Shuttles, Spindles & Skeins in Boulder, Colorado, February 18, 2017. The workshop fee includes yarn, personal style assessment, custom skirt pattern, an eight-week knit-a-long hosted by yours truly, and a finishing celebration at Shuttles, where you can show off your skirt.

Space is limited. Call Shuttles at 303-494-1071 to secure your spot.

I’ve decided to unofficially declare 2017 the year of the knitted skirt. To that end, I’m offering three of my skirt patterns (Lacy Pleats, Putting On The Pleats, and Take Two Skirt) for a combined discount of $12 (that’s more than 30% off the price of purchasing them separately). It’s a little-known fact that skirts are much easier to knit than a sweater (one piece, very little shaping, no seams, fewer fit issues) and takes about the same amount of yarn as three pairs of socks.

Each skirt features an elastic waistband, increases along four “darts” for a fitted silhouette from the waist to the high hip, then “pleats” separated by wedge-shaped “gores” to the hem. Because the skirts are knitted from the top down, it’s easy to adjust the length to your personal preference. For the best fit, choose a size that’s one to two inches smaller than your actual high-hip circumference.

Putting On The Pleats is my first skirt design in which stockinette-stitch pleats are separated by reverse stockinette stitch gores. It’s worked with sock (fingering weight) yarn at a gauge of 7.5 stitches/inch.

Sizes: 33 1/2 (35 1/2, 37 1/4, 39 1/4)” high-hip circumference (allow for 1″ to 2″ of negative ease).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As the name implies, Take-Two Skirt is my second skirt design in which I added a slip-stitch pattern in each of the pleats for a more elongated look. Like Putting On The Pleats, Take-Two is worked with sock (fingering weight) yarn at a gauge of 7.5 stitches/inch.

Sizes: 34 (36, 38, 40)” high-hip circumference (allow for 1″ to 2″ of negative ease).

 

 

 

Lacy Pleats features a simple lace design in each of the pleats, which are separated by reverse stockinette stitch gores.  This design is worked with Spirit Trails Fiberworks Brigantia at a gauge of 6 stitches/inch.

Sizes: 33 1/4 (36 3/4, 40, 43 1/4, 46 3/4)” high-hip circumference (allow for 1″ to 2″ of negative ease).

 

 

 

 

And for the adventurous knitter, I’m teaming up with Jeane DeCoster of Elemental Affects: A U.S. Yarn Company to teach a workshop on designing your own custom-fit skirt at Shuttles, Spindles & Skeins in Boulder, Colorado, February 18, 2017. The workshop fee includes yarn, personal style assessment, custom skirt pattern, an eight-week knit-a-long hosted by yours truly, and a finishing celebration at Shuttles, where you can show off your skirt.

Space is limited. Call Shuttles at 303-494-1071 to secure your spot.

Wowza!

There are currently 4994 members in my Budd’s Buds group on Ravelry! To celebrate the 5,000th member, I’m offering a 20% discount on my patterns. The actual 5,000th member will receive a free copy of one of my books.

Here’s to all of you!

Thanks to all of you who entered the raffle for a free sock pattern. Interestingly, the votes were rather evenly split between the Slip-Stitch Chevron (left) and the Topsy-Turvey (right) patterns. I decided to draw a winner for each design.

 

Congratulations to Helen Ward, who requested the Slip-Stitch Chevron pattern!

Congratulations also to Beverly Katz, who requested the Topsy-Turvey pattern!

Wishing all of you peace and prosperity!

I’m happy to announce that two new patterns have been added to my website and Ravelry.

 

Topsy-Turvey Socks were designed as a kit for Craftsy (www.craftsy.com) as a practical exercise for the class Essential Skills for Sock Knitting (https://www.craftsy.com/knitting/classes/essential-skills-for-sock-knitting/44169). The pattern can now be purchased alone on Ravelry at http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/topsy-turvey-socks. The socks feature a short-row heel and toe, but, in a deviation from the ordinary, one sock is worked from the top down and the other is worked from the toe up—no more “second sock syndrome!”

 

Slip-Stitch Chevron Socks (http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/slip-stitch-chevron-socks) were designed specifically to show off the dye pattern in Baah Yarn’s (www.baahyarn.com) special La Jolla yarn that’s dyed in about equal portions of a solid color (shown in teal here), and white with speckles (shown in purples and golds here). The challenge in this design was to make the most of both dye patterns in the confines of a narrow sock circumference. After a bit of swatching, I chose a slip-stitch chevron pattern that allows the solid or speckled portions to “travel” above the striped background. These socks feature a flap-and-gusset heel and a wedge toe, finished off with Kitchener stitch (my favorite!).

Respond to this post to tell me which pattern you’d prefer and I’ll enter you in a drawing for a free pattern. I’ll pick a winner Saturday, Dec 24.

Happy Holidays!

While I’ve been busy doing other things (such as immobilize my right thumb due to arthritis and tendonitis), a few new patterns have been uploaded on Ravelry. All three are designed to keep you (or yours) warm and cozy during the upcoming winter months. Might I add that they’d make excellent holiday gifts?

shinny-mitts-promo-1

The first is called Shinny Mitts, which are lined mittens designed for River City Yarns in Edmonton, Canada. The outer mitten is knitted with their signature RCY Hat Trick yarn (a blend of superwash merino and nylon) in the “Colorado” colorway (inspired by the Colorado Avalanche hockey team) and Rowan Kidsilk haze (a blend of mohair and silk) for a muted stripe pattern. The inner mitten (lining) is knitted with Rowan Finest, a luxurious blend of extra-fine merino, cashmere, and royal alpaca. The outer mitten is worked first, then stitches for the inner mitten are picked up along the cast-on edge and worked in the opposite direction.

The knitting couldn’t be simpler–both the mitten and lining are knitted in good old stockinette!

heavenly-mittens-promo-2The second is called Heavenly Mittens, which I also designed for River City Yarns. These mittens are similar to the Shinny Mitts shown above, but on luxury steroids, so to speak. The outer mitten is knitted in a lace pattern with one strand each of RCY Eden (a blend of merino, cashmere, and nylon) and Rowan Kisdilk Haze (a blend of mohair and silk). The inner mitten is knitted with Rowan Finest (a blend of extra-fine merino, cashmere, and royal alpaca).

Bright specks of the inner mitten peep through the eyelets in the lace pattern on the outer mitt.
 

alpine-ridges-cowl-1-cropped

The third pattern is the Alpine Rings Cowl, which I designed for the most recent Knit For Fun Retreat in Estes Park, Colorado last September. The cowl features alternating stockinette- and reverse stockinette-stitch welts created by knitting every round. To form purl stitches on each side, the work is turned every 12th round so that the “inside” alternates with the “outside” to form an accordion look. The short-row “wrap-and-turn” technique is used to help hide the small holes that form when the knitting changes direction.

I used Vice Yarn Shameless (fingering/sock weight) in a colorway designed exclusively for the retreat, but the simple pattern will look great in any yarn!

 

 

Thank you for responding to my query about when you were last photographed knitting. I loved reading about when, if ever, you were photographed knitting. I find it curious that so many of us have no photo of us knitting, even though it’s close to a daily activity. But then, I bet not many of us have had photos taken while brushing our teeth! People Knitting illustrates just how interesting a still shot of our passion can be.

The lucky winner of the raffle is Tracy Gilman, who wrote “As far as I know, no one has ever photographed me while knitting. But my husband calls knitting an ancient art form, so I’m sure even he would appreciate this book!”

Congratulations Tracy! As soon as I get your mailing address (I’ll email you separately), I’ll take it to the post office.
Let’s all make a point of having our pictures taken while knitting this holiday season!