Most of you already know that I’m smitten by handknitted skirts. I have three patternson Ravelry (from left to right:Putting On the Pleats, Take-Two Skirt, Lacy Pleats), one through Quince & Company (Tavia), and another soon to be published by a yet-to-be-disclosed yarn company, and one on my needles.

All of these skirts are knitted from the top down, beginning with the waistband facing (to hold waistband elastic), followed by four darts to increase to the high-hip circumference, then the introduction of purl stitches to create “gores” between the “pleats.” The skirts are designed to have about 2″ of negative ease around the high hips so the skirt hugs you from your waist to high hips, then the pleats begin well before the full-hip circumference so there’s no awkward “bucket-butt.” Because they’re knitted from the top down, you can customize for the most flattering length. The result is a tailored fit that hangs gracefully and looks good on all body types. It’s a little-known fact that skirts are easier to fit than sweaters and take less time than a sweater in the same weight yarn.

Next Saturday Jeane deCoster of Elemental Affects yarn and I will teach a workshop on designing and fitting a custom pleated skirt at Shuttles, Spindles and Skeins in Boulder, Colorado. The class fee of $210 includes a skirt’s worth of Elemental Affects Cormo yarn (your choice of fingering or sport weight), discussions on the best length and styling for you, personal body measurements, help filling out a custom pattern for your measurements and gauge (pick up sample yarn for swatching at Shuttles ahead of time), an 8-week knit-a-long that details all the steps of knitting the skirt, and ends with a follow-up party where you can show off your completed skirt or progress.

There are a few slots left. Call Shuttles at 303-494-1071 to register and join the fun.

 

 

The winner of the Mason-Dixon Knitting Field Guide 2: Fair Isle is Joan Miller, who wrote “These socks would be great for a knitting retreat.”

I agree Joan! Perhaps you’ll wear them to an upcoming Knit For Fun Retreat! In any case, I hope you enjoy knitting (and wearing) them!

Congratulations!

I’m delighted to have a pair of socks included in the Mason-Dixon Knitting’s Field Guide 2!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Apres-Everything Socks are knitted in a dreamy bulky yarn that’s the knitting equivalent of Trader Joe’s Dark Chocolate Almonds. Made of 505 Royal Alpaca/50% merino wool, these socks are wholly impractical for daily life. Instead they’re destined to be your favorite nonverbal way to say, “I’m relaxing now, people.”

The colorwork pattern is worked with slip stitches so that only one color of yarn is used in each round of knitting. Talk about Easy Colorwork! I can’t think of a quicker and more satisfying way to introduce a bit of color without a bit of fuss.

Respond to this post by telling me when you’d wear such cozy and comfy socks, and I’ll enter you in a drawing for a FREE copy of the book!

I’ll draw a winner after midnight Tuesday, February 7, and announce the winner Wednesday, February 8.

 

Just before the holidays I spoke with Andrea Doig of Fruity Knitting for her 22nd podcast. I’m delighted to be associated with this interesting and informative platform!

You can watch the podcast on YouTube or at the Fruity Knitting website (which also includes program notes). In this episode, you’ll also learn about waist shaping and meet Dayana of Dayana Knits, yarnbuster and tinkerer extraordinaire.

Check it out!

 

 

This Saturday (Feb 4), I’ll be teaching Top-Down Sweaters with Raglan Shaping at the Longmont Yarn Shoppe. The shop has declared 2017 the year of the sweater and is scheduling classes to encourage knitters to join in the fun. My full-day class is based on the patterns in The Knitter’s Handy Book of Top-Down Sweaters. We’ll follow modified instructions for raglan construction to knit a miniature sweater (it may fit an infant or teddy bear) and learn how to knit a raglan sweater (an example is pictured at the bottom of the book cover) from the top down and how to use The Knitter’s Handy Book of Top-Down Sweaters in general.

I’ll have a trunk show of sweaters on hand for inspiration and a collection of books to sign.

If you’re in the area, join the class or stop by and say “hi!”

 

I spent a good part of last week taping what will be my third (3rd!) class for Craftsy. This class is titled Knit Like A Master and includes as much information as I could cram into the two-hour format. For this class, I deciphered all the techniques that I feel are most important for any knitter to know.

As usual, I arrived the first day to find a star on the door of “my” studio.

I posted an Instagram expressing my delight and was pleasantly surprised that some of my followers thought it was a little lame. According to paolo_vino, “This image is not exactly expressing permanent ‘star status’ on the owner, is it? I mean: Who was chalked-in before … and Who gets chalked-in next. Come on Craftsy … You need to UP YOUR GAME!”

Well, I showed that comment (and others expressing the same thoughts) to my crew. The next day, my star was “upped”.

But that wasn’t good enough. One follower said, “Better … at least it’s not smudged!”

 

The third, and final, day I got some color! What a difference three days make! Get a load of the balls of yarn in the “d”s.

 

 

 

 

For three days I was treated by royalty (with the exception of the temporary star) and had a lot of fun, despite the many re-takes. (Sorry guys!)

Thanks to Danica (on the left) for giving my hair and face a go-over. Danica has been in charge of hair and makeup for all three of my Craftsy tapings. She’s cute as a button, thoroughly talented, and a whole lot of fun to boot. I wish I could have taken her home.

 

 

 

 

And thanks to my crew, from left to right: Rob (director of photography), me (the “talent”), Stephanie (producer), and Ivana (technical).

Due to an error on my part (I forgot to make clear the closing date for the original promotion),  I’m extending my offer three of my skirt patterns (Lacy Pleats, Putting On The Pleats, and Take Two Skirt) for a combined discount of $12 (that’s more than 30% off the price of purchasing them separately) until midnight February 2.

I’ve unofficially declared 2017 the year of handknitted skirts. It’s a little-known fact that skirts are much easier to knit than a sweater (one piece, very little shaping, no seams, fewer fit issues) and takes about the same amount of yarn as three pairs of socks.

Each skirt design features an elastic waistband, increases along four “darts” for a fitted silhouette from the waist to the high hip, then “pleats” separated by wedge-shaped “gores” to the hem. Because the skirts are knitted from the top down, it’s easy to adjust the length to your personal preference. For the best fit, choose a size that’s one to two inches smaller than your actual high-hip circumference.

Putting On The Pleats is my first skirt design in which stockinette-stitch pleats are separated by reverse stockinette stitch gores. It’s worked with sock (fingering weight) yarn at a gauge of 7.5 stitches/inch.

Sizes: 33 1/2 (35 1/2, 37 1/4, 39 1/4)” high-hip circumference (allow for 1″ to 2″ of negative ease).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As the name implies, Take-Two Skirt is my second skirt design in which I added a slip-stitch pattern in each of the pleats for a more elongated look. Like Putting On The Pleats, Take-Two is worked with sock (fingering weight) yarn at a gauge of 7.5 stitches/inch.

Sizes: 34 (36, 38, 40)” high-hip circumference (allow for 1″ to 2″ of negative ease).

 

 

 

 

 

Lacy Pleats features a simple lace design in each of the pleats, which are separated by reverse stockinette stitch gores.  This design is worked with Spirit Trails Fiberworks Brigantia at a gauge of 6 stitches/inch.

Sizes: 33 1/4 (36 3/4, 40, 43 1/4, 46 3/4)” high-hip circumference (allow for 1″ to 2″ of negative ease).

And for the adventurous knitter, I’m teaming up with Jeane DeCoster of Elemental Affects: A U.S. Yarn Company to teach a workshop on designing your own custom-fit skirt at Shuttles, Spindles & Skeins in Boulder, Colorado, February 18, 2017. The workshop fee includes yarn, personal style assessment, custom skirt pattern, an eight-week knit-a-long hosted by yours truly, and a finishing celebration at Shuttles, where you can show off your skirt.

Space is limited. Call Shuttles at 303-494-1071 to secure your spot.

I’ve decided to unofficially declare 2017 the year of the knitted skirt. To that end, I’m offering three of my skirt patterns (Lacy Pleats, Putting On The Pleats, and Take Two Skirt) for a combined discount of $12 (that’s more than 30% off the price of purchasing them separately). It’s a little-known fact that skirts are much easier to knit than a sweater (one piece, very little shaping, no seams, fewer fit issues) and takes about the same amount of yarn as three pairs of socks.

Each skirt features an elastic waistband, increases along four “darts” for a fitted silhouette from the waist to the high hip, then “pleats” separated by wedge-shaped “gores” to the hem. Because the skirts are knitted from the top down, it’s easy to adjust the length to your personal preference. For the best fit, choose a size that’s one to two inches smaller than your actual high-hip circumference.

Putting On The Pleats is my first skirt design in which stockinette-stitch pleats are separated by reverse stockinette stitch gores. It’s worked with sock (fingering weight) yarn at a gauge of 7.5 stitches/inch.

Sizes: 33 1/2 (35 1/2, 37 1/4, 39 1/4)” high-hip circumference (allow for 1″ to 2″ of negative ease).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As the name implies, Take-Two Skirt is my second skirt design in which I added a slip-stitch pattern in each of the pleats for a more elongated look. Like Putting On The Pleats, Take-Two is worked with sock (fingering weight) yarn at a gauge of 7.5 stitches/inch.

Sizes: 34 (36, 38, 40)” high-hip circumference (allow for 1″ to 2″ of negative ease).

 

 

 

Lacy Pleats features a simple lace design in each of the pleats, which are separated by reverse stockinette stitch gores.  This design is worked with Spirit Trails Fiberworks Brigantia at a gauge of 6 stitches/inch.

Sizes: 33 1/4 (36 3/4, 40, 43 1/4, 46 3/4)” high-hip circumference (allow for 1″ to 2″ of negative ease).

 

 

 

 

And for the adventurous knitter, I’m teaming up with Jeane DeCoster of Elemental Affects: A U.S. Yarn Company to teach a workshop on designing your own custom-fit skirt at Shuttles, Spindles & Skeins in Boulder, Colorado, February 18, 2017. The workshop fee includes yarn, personal style assessment, custom skirt pattern, an eight-week knit-a-long hosted by yours truly, and a finishing celebration at Shuttles, where you can show off your skirt.

Space is limited. Call Shuttles at 303-494-1071 to secure your spot.

Wowza!

There are currently 4994 members in my Budd’s Buds group on Ravelry! To celebrate the 5,000th member, I’m offering a 20% discount on my patterns. The actual 5,000th member will receive a free copy of one of my books.

Here’s to all of you!

Thanks to all of you who entered the raffle for a free sock pattern. Interestingly, the votes were rather evenly split between the Slip-Stitch Chevron (left) and the Topsy-Turvey (right) patterns. I decided to draw a winner for each design.

 

Congratulations to Helen Ward, who requested the Slip-Stitch Chevron pattern!

Congratulations also to Beverly Katz, who requested the Topsy-Turvey pattern!

Wishing all of you peace and prosperity!